Deze site maakt gebruik van cookies om te functioneren zoals verwacht. Door verder te gaan, gaat u akkoord met onze cookie policy.
Accepteren en sluiten

CBD Daily News Headlines

RDF feed: https://www.cbd.int/rss/headlines.aspx
  • Radical farming changes needed to meet net zero
    [gepubliceerd op: 23/01/2020]
    A ban on burning or extracting peat, auctioned contracts for tree planting, and an increase in crops grown for energy are just some of the ideas put forward by the government's climate change advisors to bring about dramatic falls in greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs).
  • How can China lead the global green trade drive?
    [gepubliceerd op: 23/01/2020]
    As one of the world's largest economies, China has a major role in enhancing global trade and fighting climate change. To do this, the country has to work on making its supply chains more environmentally and socially sustainable, writes WRI's Manish Bapna.
  • WEF and PwC Report Makes the Business Case for Nature
    [gepubliceerd op: 24/01/2020]
    The World Economic Forum (WEF) has released the first in a series of three New Nature Economy (NNE) reports to be published this year. The series will make the case for why the nature crisis is crucial to business and the economy; identify a set of priority socioeconomic systems for transformation; and scope the market and investment opportunities for nature-based solutions to environmental challenges.
  • It's Not Just the Oceans: Our Air Is Filled With Microplastics, Too
    [gepubliceerd op: 23/01/2020]
    Matthew Shribman, a science presenter and environmentalist, is not going to sugarcoat the devastating consequences of plastic pollution for life on Earth.
  • How design of our cities is amplifying urban heat and what to do with it
    [gepubliceerd op: 23/01/2020]
    Most of the time we discuss climate change as affecting cities and the people who live in them. Less well known is that cities - specifically their planning and design - also create climate change through the urban heat island. Encouragingly, this means that cities can provide climate solutions. Why are we not discussing this? T
  • New Zealand has been a life-raft for unique species - but now they must adapt or die
    [gepubliceerd op: 23/01/2020]
    Our nation has been in a biodiversity crisis for more than 100 years, but the climate crisis could push our at-risk animals to the brink
  • About Australia, Italy And Wildfires
    [gepubliceerd op: 23/01/2020]
    The world's attention has recently focused on the Australian wildfires caused by climate change. Yet, something similar happens every year also in Italy.
  • Climatic fluctuations impact climatic niches of owlets
    [gepubliceerd op: 23/01/2020]
    Forest Owlets are generally found in teak-dominated landscapes at the edge of the forests while Spotted Owlets are human commensals occupying human-dominated landscape
  • Closing the Ozone Hole Helped Slow Arctic Warming
    [gepubliceerd op: 23/01/2020]
    The international treaty that saved the Earth's ozone layer is often considered one of the most successful environmental efforts in history. Now there's evidence it did more than just preserve a critical shield for the planet.
  • What is Pleistocene Park, and how can it stop global warming?
    [gepubliceerd op: 23/01/2020]
    While Greta Thunberg and other green activists stage demonstrations around the world, Russian scientists are busy recreating an ecosystem that can cool Earth's climate.
  • Four graphs that suggest we can't blame climate change on solar activity
    [gepubliceerd op: 24/01/2020]
    The past decade (2010-2019) was the hottest on record and five of the top 10 warmest single years have all occurred since 2015, according to reports released by the UK Met Office and the World Meteorological Organisation.
  • David Attenborough to appear at citizens' climate assembly
    [gepubliceerd op: 24/01/2020]
    Sir David Attenborough will address members of the public who are taking part in the UK's first climate assembly this weekend. The TV presenter and naturalist will appear in Birmingham, where the 110 members are meeting to address how to reduce emissions to zero by 2050, to thank them for taking part.
  • Bushfires, ash rain, dust storms and flash floods: two weeks in apocalyptic Australia
    [gepubliceerd op: 24/01/2020]
    In Australia this summer, talking about the weather inevitably leads to talking about the apocalypse."When's the plague of locusts going to arrive?" jokes one Sydney resident after hearing reports that her city is to receive another storm of giant hailstones on Friday afternoon, just a day after it sweltered in temperatures of 40C and toxic smoke kept people stuck indoors, away from the respite of the beach.
  • Florida's iguana-geddon: cull of a pesky interloper or tasty windfall?
    [gepubliceerd op: 24/01/2020]
    The cold snap that left the reptiles falling catatonic from trees had residents dusting off recipes for an invasive species whose meat sells for $60 a pound
  • Prince Charles launches sustainability initiative at Davos
    [gepubliceerd op: 23/01/2020]
    Prince Charles took to the stage at the World Economic Forum in Davos today to emphasize the importance of combating the climate crisis, specifically at the business and financial level.
  • Climate change: 'We're not perfect', says Marion Cotillard on Antarctica trip
    [gepubliceerd op: 24/01/2020]
    Actor Marion Cotillard has travelled to Antarctica with Greenpeace to learn about how climate change, plastic waste and industrial fishing are damaging wildlife.
  • Study: Activism and civil disobedience help communicate the science of climate change
    [gepubliceerd op: 24/01/2020]
    A group of the world's top climate change biologists, including Professor Pete Smith from the University of Aberdeen, have published an editorial highlighting how global movements of civil disobedience focused on climate change are playing an important role in increasing public awareness and engagement with issues of climate change.
  • Italian wine and truffles to be at Dubai Expo 2020
    [gepubliceerd op: 23/01/2020]
    An agreement has been signed to promote Italian wine and truffles ahead of the Dubai Expo 2020.Signatories were the Italian truffle academy AIT and the Italian sommeliers' association AIS, in the presence of Foreign Undersecretary Manlio Di Stefano and the head of the Cia-Agricoltori Italiani farmers trade union Dino Scanavino.
  • Gray wolves, once nearly extinct, could be coming back to Colorado
    [gepubliceerd op: 23/01/2020]
    The gray wolf, once numbering in the tens of thousands throughout North America, have faced public vilification and extermination programs that drove it to near extinction in the US. Now Colorado will vote on whether to reintroduce them into the wild after an 80-year absence, thanks to an effort that has cattle ranchers outraged but which conservationists say could restore an ecosystem that has long suffered without the apex predator.
  • As Australia burns, the smallest species could be lost forever to the flames
    [gepubliceerd op: 23/01/2020]
    When Tanya Latty, an entomologist at the University of Sydney, started studying a species of velvet worm 18 months ago, she thought it was just a side project.
  • New Brunswick group concerned with salmon numbers in Miramichi River
    [gepubliceerd op: 23/01/2020]
    A conservation group is calling for immediate action to address what it's calling "a dramatic decline" of Atlantic salmon in New Brunswick's Miramichi River.
  • Fifteen Years to Save the Amazon Rainforest from Becoming Savannah
    [gepubliceerd op: 24/01/2020]
    The pace of deforestation in the Amazon, coupled with last year's devastating forest fires, has pushed the world's largest rainforest close to a tipping point beyond which it will turn from a carbon sink to a carbon source.
  • Australian fires underline pope's focus on biodiversity in Laudato Si'
    [gepubliceerd op: 23/01/2020]
    The devastation unleashed on wildlife by the ongoing bushfires in Australia underscores a key dimension of the worldview sketched by Pope Francis in his 2015 encyclical, "Laudato Si', on Care for Our Common Home."
  • Monarch butterfly population critically low on California coast - again
    [gepubliceerd op: 23/01/2020]
    The western monarch butterfly population wintering along California's coast remains critically low for the second year in a row, a count by an environmental group released Thursday showed.
  • Dear Australia, elegy for a summer of loss
    [gepubliceerd op: 23/01/2020]
    For months leading into this bleakest of summers, all anyone out this way could talk about was the dry. It crunched underfoot, was carried on the furnace-blast of a breeze, dust and dry leaves rattling down the wide avenues and riverbanks of the once mighty Murray River like a premonition of loss.
  • Ants run secret farms on English oak trees, photographer discovers
    [gepubliceerd op: 24/01/2020]
    Britain has a new farmed animal, which is kept in barns, milked and moved between high and low pastures - but not by humans.
  • #OceanWeek2020 - Seven days of events, discussions and activities in Brussels and beyond
    [gepubliceerd op: 24/01/2020]
    Ocean Week 2020 is seven days of events, discussions and activities in Brussels and beyond that will put the spotlight on the huge threats faced by marine species and habitats, while offering real solutions on how to solve them. We need thriving biodiversity in our oceans to support life on earth.
  • Italy's Conte Proposes Introducing Provision On Environmental Protection In Constitution
    [gepubliceerd op: 24/01/2020]
    Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte proposed on Friday introducing a provision on environmental protection and conservation of biodiversity in the republic's constitution.
  • Human health linked to state of the oceans, says US researcher
    [gepubliceerd op: 24/01/2020]
    Humankind is fundamentally connected to the ocean and we need to protect the health of the sea to protect our own health. That's the view of US ecologist Professor Phil Levin who was the keynote speaker at the three-day Transformed and Transformative Ocean Governance Conference in Port Elizabeth this week.
  • Bending with Wind, Coral Spawning linked to Ocean Environment
    [gepubliceerd op: 23/01/2020]
    During the early summer, corals simultaneously release tiny balls composed of sperms and eggs, known as bundles, that float to the ocean surface. Here the bundles open, allowing the sperm to fertilize the eggs where they eventually settle on the seafloor and become new coral on the reef.
  • Deep diving scientists discover bubbling CO2 hotspot
    [gepubliceerd op: 23/01/2020]
    Hydrologists diving off the coast of the Philippines have discovered volcanic seeps with some of the highest natural levels of C02 ever recorded. The scientists were working in Verde Island Passage, one of the most diverse marine ecosystems in the world and is home to thriving coral reefs.
  • Coral in Crisis: Can Replanting Efforts Halt Reefs' Death Spiral?
    [gepubliceerd op: 24/01/2020]
    Visit a coral reef off the coast of Miami or the Maldives and you may see fields of bleached white instead of a burst of colors.Coral reefs are in a death spiral. Many of the world's major reefs - which give the oceans life, support fisheries, prevent storm damage, provide medicine and create ocean-based tourism opportunities - are expected to disappear by 2100. Experts say coral decline has numerous causes, including chemical runoff, plastic pollution, disease and overfishing.
  • Human-wildlife conflict threatens protected reserves in East Africa
    [gepubliceerd op: 24/01/2020]
    Each year, more than a million wildebeest migrate across the grassy plains of the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania into Kenya's Masai Mara National Reserve. But on the borders of these protected areas, human populations are increasing and wild ecosystems are struggling to survive in the face of development.
  • Your plane travel destroys polar bear habitat
    [gepubliceerd op: 23/01/2020]
    A group of polar bear researchers wants you to do more than worry about the fate of these beautiful animals. They've calculated how much summer sea ice is melted per metric tonne of CO2 emissions. Then you can decide if the flight you're planning to take is worth destroying polar bear habitat.
  • Stopping yellow spot fungus that attacks wheat crops
    [gepubliceerd op: 23/01/2020]
    Scientists from the Centre for Crop and Disease Management (CCDM) and Curtin University in Western Australia have used an advanced imaging technique at the Australian Synchrotron for an in-depth look at how a fungus found in wheat crops is damaging its leaves.
  • What if Competition Isn't As "Natural" As We Think?
    [gepubliceerd op: 23/01/2020]
    Scientists are slowly understanding collaboration's role in biology, which might just help liberate our collective imagination in time to better address the climate crisis.
  • Even after death, animals are important contributors in our ecosystems, says study
    [gepubliceerd op: 23/01/2020]
    Since EU laws make it difficult to leave the carcasses of large animals in nature reserves, a new study has found evidence that animal carcasses not only provide food for many carrion-eating animal species, their nutrients also contribute to the significantly increased growth of surrounding plants.
  • Wanted - volunteers to monitor Britain's growing slug population
    [gepubliceerd op: 23/01/2020]
    Citizen scientists are being sought to help carry out the first survey in decades of Britain's slug populations. To take part, all that's required is curiosity, a garden, and a willingness to go out after dark to search for the likes of the great grey or yellow slug.
  • Yale researchers weigh in on Australian bushfires
    [gepubliceerd op: 24/01/2020]
    Yale researchers have joined the robust conversation regarding the Australian bushfires - a growing set of blazes that have drawn international statements ranging from climate activists lamenting koala deaths on Twitter to Russell Crowe appealing to the Golden Globes audience for change.
  • What we learn from a fish that can change sex in just 10 days
    [gepubliceerd op: 24/01/2020]
    The bluehead wrasse is a fish that lives in small social groups in coral reefs in the Caribbean. Only the male has a blue head-signaling his social dominance over a harem of yellow-striped females.
  • European fish stocks on the move
    [gepubliceerd op: 24/01/2020]
    Many European fish populations are on the move due to warming oceans and increasing numbers, according to new research from an international team of scientists led by the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea and the University of Aberdeen.
  • Sharp increase in Ningaloo whale shark injuries might be due to boat encounters
    [gepubliceerd op: 24/01/2020]
    Almost one-fifth of the whale sharks (Rhincodon typus) in Western Australia's Ningaloo Reef Marine Park show major scarring or fin amputations, with the number of injured animals increasing in recent years, new research reveals.
  • The effect of wildfires on sustainable development
    [gepubliceerd op: 22/01/2020]
    With only 10 years left to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, world leaders in September 2019 called for accelerated action in the next decade to deliver at the scale and speed required. Climate change and global heating however, are increasing the likelihood and intensity of wildfires, which could have a growing impact on the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals.
  • Decade of Action on the Sustainable Development Goals is under way
    [gepubliceerd op: 23/01/2020]
    The Sustainable Development Goals are known as the world's blueprint to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all. They address the global challenges we face, including those related to poverty, inequality, climate change, environmental degradation, peace and justice. The 17 goals are all interconnected, and in order to leave no one behind, it is important that they are all achieved by 2030.