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CBD Daily News Headlines

RDF feed: https://www.cbd.int/rss/headlines.aspx
  • 'Not enough water': Cambodia's farmers face changing climate
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    During Cambodia's monsoon season, rice farmer Sam Vongsay's backyard fills with water and the plastic trash of his houseboat-dwelling neighbours as the Tonle Sap lake grows with floodwaters from the Mekong River.
  • Milk without the cow: Cellular agriculture could be the future of farming, but dairy farmers need help
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    A new wave of cow-less dairy is hitting the market. In the United States, Perfect Day is using genetically modified fungi to produce milk protein for ice cream at a commercial scale. And pre-commercial companies, like TurtleTree and Better Milk, are engineering mammary cells to produce human and cow milk in laboratories, although these remain in the early stages of development.
  • Large Herbivores May Improve an Ecosystem's Carbon Persistence
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    Wildlife and open-canopy ecosystems like grasslands are rarely a part of discussions surrounding climate change mitigation. Now, a new review points to interactions between wild herbivores and vegetation to show how restoration efforts could be optimized by aligning climate goals with biodiversity conservation.
  • IKEA buys land damaged by hurricane in Florida to plant forests
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    Ingka Group, the owner of most IKEA furniture stores worldwide, has bought more land in the United States as part of a long-term commitment to responsible forest management, it said on Thursday.
  • Elephants dying from eating plastic waste in Sri Lankan dump
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    Sri Lanka (AP) - Conservationists and veterinarians are warning that plastic waste in an open landfill in eastern Sri Lanka is killing elephants in the region, after two more were found dead over the weekend.
  • Londoners told to reduce physical activity on Friday due to pollution
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    Londoners should avoid strenuous physical activity on Friday due to "very high" levels of pollution, experts have warned. The poor air quality is the result of an intense area of high pressure covering western Europe. The associated lack of air movement means emissions from vehicles and other pollutants are not blown away as they usually would be.
  • 'Banned' bee-harming pesticide approved for use, despite expert advice
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    Emergency use of a product containing the chemical thiamethoxam has been authorised in England because of a virus which affects sugar beets.
  • In Kathmandu, a struggle for water amid worsening floods
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    Stuffed garbage bags float gently down the Bisnumati River in the western part of Kathmandu. The river, sacred to Nepal's Hindu and Buddhist populations, is one of the main waterways running through the Kathmandu Valley. Brownish water empties from pipes directly into the river: unfiltered sewage from households and factories.
  • Message to mayors: cities need nature
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    My home town of New Delhi is battling with air pollution, contaminated water supplies and heatwaves. Just last November, schools were shut for more than a week because of untenable air quality.
  • Kazakh people are fighting to preserve the natural lakes of Nur-Sultan
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    For two years now, residents and experts have been fighting to preserve the Taldykol natural lakes system in the new city centre of Nur-Sultan, the capital of Kazakhstan, that city authorities are filling up to build urban housing estates.
  • Climate change: Inadequate governmental response is causing climate anxiety in young people
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    Governments around the world must protect the mental health of young people by taking action against climate change, a study from The Lancet Planetary Health has concluded.
  • The world's insatiable appetite for electricity is setting up a climate disaster
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    A report published Friday by the International Energy Agency found that global demand for electricity surged 6% in 2021, fueled by a colder winter and the dramatic economic rebound from the pandemic. That drove both prices and carbon emissions to new records.
  • Concerns for life in Western Australia's Pilbara after 50.7C heat record matched
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    The Bureau of Meteorology is working to verify readings showing the northern Western Australia town of Onslow has matched the record for the hottest day in Australia, prompting calls to make living with extreme heatwaves in the Pilbara more sustainable.
  • World's poorest bear brunt of climate crisis: 10 underreported emergencies
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    From Afghanistan to Ethiopia, about 235 million people worldwide needed assistance in 2021. But while some crises received global attention, others are lesser known.
  • Creating A Microclimate To Fight Climate Change
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    In 1982, when David and Margery bought their little house in an ex-public housing estate, they could look out of their bedroom windows and see what everyone had worn for the week, because you could see everyone's washing on the lines in their backyards. His love of nature was developed in early years living close to nature in Malta and the English Midlands.
  • The solution to climate change will be people-powered. Here's why
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    In our critically endangered world, there is no version of the future in which humanity can continue as it has always done. The climate crisis was created by the actions of people, and it is people who are going to have to act to manage its impact.
  • Study: Climate change alters tiger shark migration routes
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    The new study, published on 13 January 2022 in the journal Global Change Biology and conducted by scientists at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, revealed that rising ocean temperatures due to climate change have significantly changed the locations and timings of tiger shark migration patterns in the western North Atlantic Ocean.
  • Companies Across The Globe Feeling The Climate Change Heat
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    As the climate crisis exacerbates weather conditions, businesses around the world are beginning to feel the heat. On home turf, the financial impact of climate risks to Indian companies is calculated to be around Rs 7,138 billion, according to a 2020 report by Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP).
  • To survive climate change, Venice needs to rethink its outdated flood defenses
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    The 3rd of October, 2020, was a momentous day for Venetians. A high tide had been predicted, which would normally have seen low-lying areas of the city under several inches of water. On this day, however, the streets remained miraculously dry.
  • State of the climate: How the world warmed in 2021
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    The climate data for 2021 is now mostly in, and it has proved to be another noteworthy year across the oceans, atmosphere, cryosphere and surface temperature of the planet.
  • Tongan volcano's eruption unlikely to cool down climate change
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    The National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) believes the major natural disaster centred around Tonga will not contribute to Earth's temperature cooling significantly.
  • The Climate Conversation No One Wants
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    The U.N. climate change conference in Glasgow, Scotland, brought a series of positive steps for implementing the Paris Agreement. It also reinvigorated U.S.-China cooperation and offered opportunities for voluntary initiatives on methane and forests.
  • Local shell-ebrities: 19 eggs of critically endangered sea turtle bring joy to Cambodian conservationists
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    The Wildlife Conservation Society Cambodia Programme (WCS Cambodia) said it was delighted to see 19 Royal Turtle eggs in a single clutch on an artificial sand bank at the Koh Kong Reptile Conservation Centre (KKRCC) in one night last week.
  • LOOK: Endangered lappet-faced vulture nesting sites saw a 60% decline in 2021
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    Vulture populations across Africa and some parts of the world have seen a steady decline for decades with certain species such as the white-backed vulture listed as critically endangered by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, the same threat level as the black rhino, and a considerably higher threat level than the white rhino.
  • Entangled humpback whale's sad fate has researchers calling for action on fishing nets
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    A juvenile humpback whale has been spotted in the Antarctic entangled in fishing gear, leading to calls from conservationists for better protections along migration corridors.
  • Greater Mekong primates struggle to cling on amid persistent threats: Report
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    When scientists described the Popa langur (Trachypithecus popa) as a species new to science in 2020, it was already staring extinction in the face. Fewer than 260 of the fluffy gray leaf-eating monkeys are estimated to remain across four precariously isolated patches of forest on Myanmar's central plains, where their survival is threatened by habitat loss and hunting.
  • Ambitious tree planting goals in Asia lack diverse tree seeds from native species
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    Four Asian countries-the Philippines, Indonesia, Malaysia and India-aim to restore 47.5 million hectares of degraded land by 2030. This is roughly equal to the size of Sumatra, Indonesia's third biggest island.
  • Forest Report brings out Arunachal Pradesh's loss of green gold
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    The India State of Forest Report 2021 has vindicated what activists, lawyers and academicians have been saying all along - Arunachal Pradesh, which is the second largest forested state in India, is losing its primary forests and that too at a large scale every passing year.
  • In the Atlantic Forest, the lowland tapir is at risk of extinction
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    Lowland tapir populations in the Atlantic Forest in South America are at risk of almost complete disappearance, scientists have estimated. Weighing up to 250 kg, the animal can adapt to most habitats in South America-but its populations continue to decline across its range.
  • Mysterious velvet worm lurks in local forests
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    Did you know an animal is lurking in the forests of Trinidad and Tobago that is so rare and strange, you may think it's something right out of a science fiction movie?
  • Bare-faced curassows return to Argentina's Iberá after 50-year absence
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    Biologist Sofía Zalazar wasn't born yet the last time a bare-faced curassow was seen in the Iberá forests in Argentina. The bird began disappearing from the wild in the 1970s, surviving only in small populations in forest areas in the provinces of Chaco and Formosa, in the northeast of the country.
  • Baby elephant enjoys lovely forest feast, watch viral video here
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    Well-aware of her habits, the keepers always have a stash of lucerne pellets ready in their pockets to treat the baby elephant.A video clip showcasing the antics of a baby elephant is winning hearts on the internet. In the video, baby elephant Enkesha can be seen enjoying her lovely forest feast for her good behaviour.
  • Norway blows up hydro dam to restore river health and fish stocks
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    A dam that has blocked the Tromsa River in Norway for more than 100 years was blown up with dynamite this week, freeing migratory routes for fish.
  • In untangling a taxonomic web, Sri Lankan researchers describe seven new jumping spiders
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    With two large eyes on a flat rectangular face, and six more eyes around the head, jumping spiders from the Salticidae family can look a bit alien, even by arachnid standards.
  • Environmental disasters are fuelling migration - here's why international law must recognize climate refugees
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    When hurricanes Eta and Iota barrelled into Central America in November 2020, they flooded towns and cities, caused catastrophic losses in the agricultural sector and contributed to food insecurity. In all, 4.7 million Hondurans were affected, and tens of thousands decided to leave, forming migrant caravans in a desperate attempt to rebuild their lives in the United States.
  • The Elites Can't Stop Climate Change, but Democratic Cities Can
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    There is little doubt that very few expected anything meaningful and productive to come out of the COP26. Even before the beginning of the summit, climate scientists such as Peter Kalmus, author of Being the Change: Live Well and Spark a Climate Revolution, warned[2] that one of the summit's main goals - "Net Zero by 2050" - is deeply flawed plan that provides cover for big oil and politicians to preserve the status quo.
  • Why governments need to tackle the impact of trade on climate change
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    The production and trade of goods is at the heart of the globalised market and has a significant environmental impact. Yet there was little discussion at COP26 on how to make it more sustainable, the former director of the World Trade Institute (WTI) tells SWI swissinfo.ch.
  • Tree ambulance to protect biodiversity
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    In an effort to ensure protection and preservation of trees in the capital, the Kerala Youth Promotion Council jointly with the CSR wing under KIMS Health has launched a tree ambulance. Agriculture Minister P Prasad, who flagged off the Tree Ambulance at an event held on Secretariat premises, said the initiative would help make the environment more carbon neutral.
  • China's action on air pollution can help restore trust in a greener future
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    China took environmental action by improving air quality in Beijing ahead of the 2008 Summer Olympics. President Xi Jinping's pledge that China will be carbon neutral by 2060 requires global cooperation.
  • New forest certification standards offer nature-based solutions to the climate crisis
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    The Sustainable Forestry Initiative's (SFI) updated forest certification standards provide solutions to some of the world's most pressing sustainability challenges. Sustainable forest management and the procurement of wood products from sustainably managed sources are critical tools that help avoid deforestation.
  • National And International Frameworks Are Imperative For Implementing Nature-Based Solutions In Asia
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    Recognized by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), nature-based solutions (NbS) refer to solutions that bring together human well-being, environmental sustainability, and biodiversity benefits.
  • Old tamarind and neem trees in north Karnataka get biodiversity heritage tag
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    In an effort to save century-old trees along the Byadagi-Motebennurroad,the Biodiversity Management Committee Byadagi declared the 1.4m stretch a Conservation Habitat of Tamarind & Neem trees Biodiversity Heritage Site.
  • Government says its climate change curbs inadequate
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    The government has admitted that its efforts to insulate the UK from climate change impacts have been inadequate. It says coping with even a relatively low level of climate change could cost Britain many billions of pounds a year.
  • Covid: Viral photo highlights challenges of vaccinating Amazon
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    A photo of an indigenous man carrying his father on his back to take a Covid-19 vaccine in the Brazilian Amazon has gone viral, and became a symbol of the complicated vaccination logistics in one of the world's most remote areas.
  • Decline of biodiversity, health of Indigenous peoples interconnected
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    When Danika Littlechild was growing up in Maskwacis, Alta., her uncle would pick her up after school and walk her home through the bush to her kôhkom's (grandmother's) house. He would show her different plants and fungi along the way, teaching her their names and telling stories about when to harvest and how to use them for medicine.
  • 'We started eating them': what do you do with an invasive army of crayfish clones?
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    Small, bluish-grey and speckled, it would be easy to overlook the marbled crayfish. Except for the fact it is likely to be coming to a pond or river near you soon - if it is not already there.
  • Coral reefs are dying, but there's a tiny bit of good news about what happens when they're gone
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    In 1998, a mass bleaching event hit reefs in the Seychelles, leading to a devastating loss of 90% of the African island nation's live coral. While that event wasn't caused by climate change (rather by El Niño, a recurring climate pattern that causes ocean warming every few years), global heating has increased the frequency of these harmful incidents, which strip coral of the microalgae coating that supplies sea life with a nutritious food source.
  • Could the Red Sea's heat-resilient corals help restore the world's dying reefs?
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    Corals in the Gulf of Aqaba have a unique evolutionary history that could help them survive the climate crisis. Scientists even hope to breed their resilience into other reefs.
  • Malaysia: Buddhist monks fight to protect mountain home
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    A cool breeze sweeps through the Dhamma Sakyamuni Monastery. Sitting cross-legged on the polished stone floor, monks meditate silently under the gaze of a Buddha painted gold. Above them, stalactites hang from the rough limestone ceiling.
  • Ecuador to announce creation of Hermandad Marine Reserve off Galapagos (commentary)
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    "Ecuador is proud to announce the creation of the Hermandad Marine Reserve in the coming days," the country's president declares in an opinion piece shared with Mongabay.
  • What COVID-19 can teach fish farms
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    When it comes to the business of seafood, COVID-19 hasn't been nearly as damaging as the ecological havoc caused by humans, a recent global survey of fish farms found.
  • The Sixth Global Biodiversity Mass Extinction is Already Happening
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    Extreme natural phenomena have caused mass biodiversity extinction five times throughout the history of life on Earth. Many experts now believe that a Sixth Mass Extinction is underway, this time caused entirely by human activities.
  • Strong evidence shows Sixth Mass Extinction of global biodiversity in progress
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    The history of life on Earth has been marked five times by events of mass biodiversity extinction caused by extreme natural phenomena. Today, many experts warn that a Sixth Mass Extinction crisis is underway, this time entirely caused by human activities.
  • 'Nothing but fish nests': huge icefish colony found in Antarctic sea
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    Researchers exploring Antarctica's seabed have discovered a thriving, unprecedented colony of icefish "about a third of the size of London".
  • New study overturns popular theory on evolution of termite size
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    Researchers have completed a comprehensive analysis of the head width of over 1500 species of termites and determined that their size isn't gradually shrinking at a geological timescale.
  • Copper-based chemicals may be contributing to ozone depletion
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    Copper released into the environment from fungicides, brake pads, antifouling paints on boats and other sources may be contributing significantly to stratospheric ozone depletion, according to a new study from the University of California, Berkeley.
  • Rivers speeding up Arctic ice melt at alarming rate, experts say
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    Irina Panyushkina grew up in Siberia, near the Arctic Circle. She was raised on stories of explorers trudging through seas of ice to reach the North Pole.
  • Earth's interior is cooling faster than expected
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    Researchers at ETH Zurich have demonstrated in the lab how well a mineral common at the boundary between the Earth's core and mantle conducts heat. This leads them to suspect that the Earth's heat may dissipate sooner than previously thought.
  • Groundwater measurements of herbicide may underestimate human exposure
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    Atrazine ranks as a common herbicide in the United States-where it's popular to elevate corn and sorghum yields by curbing weed growth.
  • Meet a colorful but color-blind spider
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    Jumping spiders, the flamboyant dandies of the eight-legged set, have names inspired by peacocks, cardinals and other colorful icons.
  • Scientists uncover 'resistance gene' in deadly E. coli
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    Scientists have pinpointed a gene that helps deadly E. coli bacteria evade antibiotics, potentially leading to better treatments for millions of people worldwide
  • Two new species of freshwater goby fish discovered in the Philippines
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    A team of biologists from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) in Japan and Western Philippines University (WPU) in the Philippines have found two new species of goby fish in Palawan, a Philippine archipelago. The goby fish, both belonging to the genus Rhinogobius, were described recently in the journal Zootaxa.
  • Researchers discover activation mechanisms in soybean for adaptation to saline soil
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    Farmlands are turning more saline due to climate change, rising sea levels, expanding drylands and groundwater depletion. This crisis is exacerbated by unsustainable farming practices. The resulting loss in crop yield threatens malnourished populations across the globe.
  • Recovering mantle memories from river profiles
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    The continent of Africa has a distinctive physical geography-an "egg carton" pattern of basins and swells-that researchers attribute to plumes of mantle rocks rising beneath a tectonic plate.
  • Six questions to understand the sixth warmest year on record
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    2021 tied with 2018 as the sixth warmest year on a record that extends back to 1880, according to NASA's annual analysis of global average temperatures. The year contributed to an unprecedented, but well-understood trend in which the last eight years have been the warmest ever recorded.
  • Technological solutions to droughts
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    Perennial water shortages in California will likely only grow worse due to climate change. But emerging technologies offer hope-if Californians can stop taking water for granted, says David Feldman, UCI professor of urban planning & public policy and director of Water UCI.
  • Repeated exposure to major disasters has long-term mental health impacts
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    Repeated exposure to major disasters does not make people mentally stronger, a recent study from the Texas A&M; University School of Public Health found that individuals who have been repeatedly exposed to major disasters show a reduction in mental health scores.
  • Coastal erosion may force retreat from the sea
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    Giving up land to the sea needs to be one of the options considered for responding to serious erosion events along our coastline, says a University of the Sunshine Coast researcher.
  • Atmospheric river storm observations over Pacific Ocean to expand this winter
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    "Hurricane Hunter" aircraft are mobilizing for an expanded 13-week period that began Jan. 5 to glean critical data for improving forecasts of atmospheric river storms over the Pacific Ocean. Such storms provide up to half of the U.S. West Coast's annual precipitation and a majority of the flooding.
  • Why satellites are key to understanding Pacific volcano
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    When an enormous underwater volcanic eruption occurred in the South Pacific near Tonga on Saturday, satellites were in position to capture what had happened.
  • Is there a difference between aging and getting old?
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    Some creatures don't age in the same way that humans do, implying that getting old does not necessarily lead to declining health. This is according to a new study focused on fish aging led by an international team of biologists-the findings of which have just been published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences.
  • How cadmium affects larval flounder under seawater acidification
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    Seawater acidification is a major threat to both calcifying and non-calcifying marine organisms, mostly affecting the immune system and biomineralization or the acid-base regulatory system.
  • Waves from the Tonga tsunami are still being felt in Australia, and even a 50cm surge could knock you off your feet
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    The eruption of the underwater volcano Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha'apai created a tsunami felt across the Pacific Ocean. This includes Australia, where small but measurable tsunami waves were still being recorded as late as Monday afternoon. These may even persist into Tuesday morning.
  • Dimming Sun's rays should be off-limits, say experts
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    Planetary-scale engineering schemes designed to cool Earth's surface and lessen the impact of global heating are potentially dangerous and should be blocked by governments, more than 60 policy experts and scientists said on Monday.
  • Huge Tonga volcanic eruption caused 'significant damage'
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    A massive volcanic eruption in Tonga that triggered tsunami waves around the Pacific caused "significant damage" to the island nation's capital and smothered it in dust, but the full extent was unclear with communications still hampered Monday.
  • Detailing lake trout reproductive response to sea lamprey parasitism
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    Newly published research from MSU scientists details the reproductive response of two types of Michigan lake trout found in Lake Superior-siscowets and leans-to sea lamprey parasitism, and the results coincide with a long-held evolutionary theory.
  • Trail of African bling reveals 50,000-year-old social network
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    Scientists have uncovered the world's oldest social network, a web of connections that flourished 50,000 years ago and stretched for thousands of miles across Africa.
  • Tonga volcanic eruption: What happened, what we know and the aftermath of destruction
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    The powerful eruption of the Hunga-Tonga-Hunga-Ha'apai volcano sent tsunami waves around the world on Saturday as increased water levels were reported in Peru, New Zealand, Japan and the United States.
  • Scientists struggle to collect info from Tonga volcano after massive eruption
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    Scientists are struggling to monitor an active volcano that erupted off the South Pacific island of Tonga at the weekend, after the explosion destroyed its sea-level crater and drowned its mass, obscuring it from satellites.
  • Tonga calls for 'immediate aid' after volcanic eruption, tsunami
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    Tonga is calling for "immediate aid", with an urgent need for fresh water and food, as it assesses the damage caused by Saturday's eruption of Hunga-Tonga-Hunga-Ha'apai.
  • Humans have climate change to thank for the shape of our teeth, fossil reveals
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    A 300 million-year-old fossil found in the US is shedding new light on how climate change shaped the way our teeth look today. Researchers at the University of Bristol, UK, say this newly discovered extinct reptile species reveals the earliest known origins of mammals' incisors, canines and molars.
  • Tracing the origins of plants in West African cuisine
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, in co-operation with colleagues from Goethe University, Frankfurt, has uncovered the first insights into the origins of West African plant-based cuisine, locked inside pottery fragments dating back some 3,500 years ago.
  • Fighting weeds in a changing world
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    The world is warming. And fast. By 2050, it's likely the planet will have warmed by about 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit compared to before the Industrial Revolution. That warming brings substantial changes. Storms will be stronger. People will run their air conditioners more. It will even change when and where our crops grow-and how well they perform.
  • Evolution follows climate: Oaks adapted rapidly to climate change in the Anthropocene
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    The acceleration of global warming due to human activities has made the pace of tree evolution and adaptation a core concern of researchers and foresters. Researchers from INRAE, the ONF, the CEA and the universities of Uppsala (Sweden) and Zhejiang (China) studied the evolution of oak trees in three French forests over the last three centuries, from the cold period of the Little Ice Age to the warming caused by human activities.
  • Major new study shows role beavers could play in restoring Scotland's rivers
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    Beavers could make an important contribution to improving the condition of Scotland's rivers, including helping to improve water quality and limiting the effects of drought.
  • Zimbabwean women leverage traditional knowledge to sustain livelihoods
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    Early in the morning in Domboshava, a village near Harare, two women were gathering herbs in a lush green forest. A branch at a time, the women carefully pruned the shrubs, making sure they leave the plants in good health.
  • Decolonizing Conservation: Native Communities Know How to Protect Nature
    [gepubliceerd op: 14/01/2022]
    This piece originally appeared in Nexus Media. It is republished here with permission. Jessica Hernandez found her way to conservation science and environmental justice through her grandmother-and her knowledge about the natural world, accumulated over generations.
  • West Bengal biodiversity board attempts to bring back traditional crop varieties
    [gepubliceerd op: 17/01/2022]
    The West Bengal Biodiversity Board (WBBB) has prepared People's Biodiversity Registers containing comprehensive account of local bio-resources along with related traditional knowledge and practices of the area. Efforts are now on to come up with at least five 'seed banks' across the state.