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CBD Daily News Headlines

RDF feed: https://www.cbd.int/rss/headlines.aspx
  • To Meet Paris Agreement Targets, India Should Pay More Attention to Soil
    [gepubliceerd op: 26/03/2020]
    The nationally determined contributions (NDCs) to the Paris Agreement typically include afforestation and reduced deforestation as additional carbon sinks. The first Biennial Transparency Reports for NDCs submitted in 2015 are due in 2022 for developed countries to 2024 for developing countries. But debates continue about the feasibility of both temperature-based and carbon-based climate change targets.
  • Agriculture and biodiversity: A make or break for European Green Deal
    [gepubliceerd op: 30/03/2020]
    A recent impact report published by the European Commission lays bare the terrible mismatch between the EU's Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) and the bloc's biodiversity objectives, writes Jabier Ruiz.
  • Country diary: beauty and the bee orchids
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    I push the spade beneath the neat rosette of leaves, trying carefully not to castrate the plant. Castrate may seem an odd choice of word, I am after all just digging up a plant to move it, but hidden in the soil, underneath that Garden of Eden fan of greenery, there are two oval tubers, and they look just like testicles.
  • Researchers discover a novel chemistry to protect our crops from fungal disease
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    Pathogenic fungi pose a huge and growing threat to global food security. Currently, we protect our crops against fungal disease by spraying them with anti-fungal chemistries, also known as fungicides.
  • When agriculture focuses on profit instead of food
    [gepubliceerd op: 02/04/2020]
    In the mid-20th century, the so-called Green Revolution changed humanity's relationship with agriculture. A series of technological advances in high-yielding varieties of rice and wheat seeds, along with irrigation systems and new fertilisers and pesticides - which marked the official entry of the chemical industry into the field - brought about a dramatic increase in agricultural productivity.
  • 'Put Earth first': can a greener, fairer fashion industry emerge from crisis?
    [gepubliceerd op: 27/03/2020]
    After Covid19, the best we can hope for the fashion industry is a rebirth that puts people and planet ahead of profits. Earth Hour this Saturday is a further reminder that every moment counts.
  • Nestlé reports 'significant progress' in cocoa restoration efforts
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    Nestlé has reported significant progress in its efforts to help end deforestation and restore forests in its cocoa supply chain in Côte d'Ivoire and Ghana.
  • Barclays sets net zero carbon target for 2050 after investor pressure
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    Barclays has bowed to investor pressure over its climate track record and announced plans to shrink its carbon footprint to net zero by 2050.The bank, which has its headquarters in London, has pledged to align all of its financing activities with the goals and timelines of the Paris agreement, starting with the energy and power sectors, and to publish "transparent targets" to track its progress.
  • Plastic: How to predict threats to animals in oceans and rivers
    [gepubliceerd op: 30/03/2020]
    Hosepipes inside a sperm whale, plastic banana bags eaten by green turtles and a shotgun cartridge inside a True's beaked whale. Just some of the examples of plastic found inside wildlife that have been documented in scientific reports.
  • Coronavirus UK lockdown causes big drop in air pollution
    [gepubliceerd op: 30/03/2020]
    The nationwide shutdown caused by the coronavirus outbreak has led to big drops in air pollution across the UK's major cities, new data analysis shows. Levels of toxic pollutants were likely to fall even further, scientists said, as traffic remained off the roads but prevailing westerly winds from the Atlantic returned. Current easterly winds are bringing additional pollution from continental Europe to Britain.
  • Air pollution: through the smog darkly - archive, 1965
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    I've put my baby down for the night. He's coughing, spluttering, feverish, and miserable. In the morning his eyelids will be stuck together, he'll be apathetic and off his food. Diagnosis - bronchitis. Treatment - the red drops from the doctor. He'll soon be over it but he'll get it again and again.
  • Report reveals 'massive plastic pollution footprint' of drinks firms
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    Four global drinks giants are responsible for more than half a million tonnes of plastic pollution in six developing countries each year, enough to cover 83 football pitches every day, according to a report.
  • Lockdown eases seasonal smog - but less than expected
    [gepubliceerd op: 02/04/2020]
    We think of spring as the time of blossom and fresh new green growth, but it is often the most polluted time of year in western Europe. Last week, as winds turned easterly, particle pollution once again spread across western Europe. Spring smogs can cause particle pollution to reach the top value of 10 in the UK air quality index, but four to nine is more typical.
  • Utrecht rooftops to be 'greened' with plants and mosses in new plan
    [gepubliceerd op: 30/03/2020]
    Every roof in the city district of Utrecht is to be "greened" with plants and mosses or have solar panels installed under plans driven by the success of a similar scheme for the municipality's bus stops.
  • How to increase biodiversity across cities
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    Cities and their surrounding areas are expanding. And this dramatically affects ecosystems. Urban areas are often perceived to have lower biodiversity than the countryside, but some recent studies suggest that urban land can support pollinator populations.
  • Nature takes back world's empty city streets
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    As humans retreat into their homes as more and more countries go under coronavirus lockdown, wild animals are slipping cover to explore the empty streets of some of our biggest cities.
  • Urban birds need to be smart or fast-breeding
    [gepubliceerd op: 02/04/2020]
    To thrive in urban environments, birds need to either have large brains, or breed many times over their life, according to a new study involving UCL.
  • Less ice, more methane from northern lakes: A result from global warming
    [gepubliceerd op: 30/03/2020]
    Shorter and warmer winters lead to an increase in emissions of methane from northern lakes, according to a new study by scientists in Finland and the US. Longer ice-free periods contribute to increased methane emissions. In Finland, emissions of methane from lakes could go up by as much as 60%.
  • 'Why have carbon dioxide levels risen and fallen in the past?'
    [gepubliceerd op: 30/03/2020]
    This is not the column I planned to publish this month. I wrote another one several weeks ago in answer to a reader's question about tourism in Europe. As you might imagine, that column was swiftly rendered out of date, becoming nothing more than a time capsule of life before COVID-19 became a global pandemic.
  • Coral tells own tale about El Niño's past
    [gepubliceerd op: 30/03/2020]
    There is no longer a need to guess what ocean temperatures were like in the remote tropical Pacific hundreds of years ago. The ancient coral that lived there know all.
  • What can we learn from COVID-19 to help with climate change?
    [gepubliceerd op: 30/03/2020]
    Today, the Covid-19 pandemic is all anyone can talk about. Societies around the world are coming to a standstill, and concern for most matters other than the coronavirus have been pushed aside.
  • Zero Hour: There's No Stopping Climate Change, But How Bad It Gets Is Still Up To Us
    [gepubliceerd op: 30/03/2020]
    When people you love are sick and dying, it's hard to think about anything else. In the course of just a few short weeks, the coronavirus has upended our daily lives, causing immense suffering and economic chaos around the world.
  • Ozone Layer Is Recovering, Thanks To Climate Change Treaty Signed Over 30 Years Ago, Finds Study
    [gepubliceerd op: 30/03/2020]
    Earth's ozone layer, responsible for protecting the planet from Sun's ultraviolet rays, has been healing and might even fully recover, a recent study has revealed. The study, published in the science journal Nature, said that the recovering ozone hole might have been a result of the 1987 Montreal Protocol.
  • How Madagascar shapes southern Africa's rainfall: climate modeller adds puzzle piece
    [gepubliceerd op: 30/03/2020]
    The island of Madagascar off the south-east African coast is about twice the size of the United Kingdom, measuring 1,500 km from top to toe, and 600 km at its broadest width.
  • Why we react fast to pandemics but slow to climate change
    [gepubliceerd op: 30/03/2020]
    Psychologists say that humans have evolved to put a greater focus on immediate threats rather than future problems. Within months of the first official cases of COVID-19, the death toll soared over 20,000 and prompted countries to shut down their borders and put their economies on a pause.
  • Canada needs potato varieties suited for climate change
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    With climate change also becoming a thing on Canada's crop lands, identifying and/or developing new potato varieties that can grow in warmer temperatures is one of the goals of the research teams of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC).
  • Can 'Carbon Smart' Farming Play a Key Role in the Climate Fight?
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    Trey Hill led a small group of fellow farmers to a field outside his office in Rock Hall on Maryland's Eastern Shore. It was a cloudy February day, but the ground was alive with color - purple and red turnip tops mixing exuberantly with green rye, vetch and clover, and beneath it all, rich brown soil. Hill reached down, yanked a long, thick, white daikon radish from the earth and showed his visitors sumptuous coffee-colored clods clinging to hairy rootlets.
  • A place that makes you ask the questions that really matter
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    Visitors to Antarctica are often awed and humbled by its size, and its extreme climate. But it also caused the BBC's Justin Rowlatt to reflect on the human ability to solve problems together - and to feel hope for the future.
  • 'Climate change is still on, no matter what happens with coronavirus
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    No, dolphins are not frequenting the canals of Venice again. But nature is responding to the fact that a third of the world's population is now living in lockdown in the face of the global COVID-19 pandemic.
  • The coronavirus outbreak is part of the climate change crisis
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    The speed and scope of the coronavirus outbreak have taken world governments by surprise and left the stock market reeling. Since the virus first appeared in China's Hubei province, it has infected over 700,000 people and killed more than 33,000 across the world in less than six months.
  • India's women seaweed divers swim against the tide of climate change
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    In a blue plastic barrel, Meenakshi Mookupori packed her belongings for a five-day stay on an island in the Indian Ocean, off the Coromandal coast of south India.
  • Battle against climate-change requires individual action we see in fight against virus
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    This was a thought-provoking letter, but it falls short of the real lessons we can learn as a human race from this epidemic, because saving our environment goes well beyond what Justin Trudeau and his government can do.
  • Scientists list four key actions to halt global warming
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    The latest edition of the JRC's Global Energy and Climate Outlook (GECO), identifies four technological dynamics in the energy sector that have the power to limit global warming to below 2°C if implemented simultaneously.
  • 'We must use this time well': climate experts hopeful after Cop26 delay
    [gepubliceerd op: 02/04/2020]
    Green campaigners and climate leaders have vowed to keep up the pressure on governments around the world to make stringent new commitments on the climate crisis, as a vital UN climate summit was delayed until next year because of the coronavirus pandemic.
  • Does Climate Change Still Matter in a Pandemic?
    [gepubliceerd op: 02/04/2020]
    Climate change didn't stop while the world turned its attention to combating the coronavirus.On this week's episode of Political Climate we discuss: will leaders seize the moment to tackle more than one crisis?
  • Nova Scotia puts climate change consultation on hold because of COVID-19
    [gepubliceerd op: 02/04/2020]
    A new climate change strategy for Nova Scotia hinges upon public consultation, which has now been postponed because of the COVID-19 pandemic. In October, the provincial government passed the Sustainable Development Goals Act, which requires the province to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 53 per cent below 2005 levels by 2030, and reach net-zero emissions by 2050.
  • Climate change clips nightingales' wings, making them less likely to survive migration: Study
    [gepubliceerd op: 02/04/2020]
    New Delhi: Climate change has been increasingly endangering the Common Nightingale because its wings are getting shorter, found a new study conducted by a group of Spanish researchers. Shorter wings will, over time, make this songbird less likely to survive its annual migration.
  • How climate change and the coronavirus are linked
    [gepubliceerd op: 02/04/2020]
    We live in an age in which intersecting crises are being lifted to a global scale, with unseen levels of inequality, environmental degradation and climate destabilization, as well as new surges in populism, conflict, economic uncertainty, and mounting public health threats. All are crises that are slowly tipping the balance, questioning our business-as-usual economic model of the past decades, and requiring us to rethink our next steps.
  • Arctic climate change - it's recent carbon emissions we should fear, not ancient methane 'time bombs'
    [gepubliceerd op: 02/04/2020]
    The Arctic is predicted to warm faster than anywhere else in the world this century, perhaps by as much as 7°C. These rising temperatures threaten one of the largest long-term stores of carbon on land: permafrost.
  • Global warming wreaks havoc on Japanese edible kelp
    [gepubliceerd op: 02/04/2020]
    In the not too distant future, global warming could deprive Japanese cuisine of an essential element: konbu, or edible kelp.
  • 'Thank you Greta': natural solutions to UK flooding climb the agenda
    [gepubliceerd op: 02/04/2020]
    Here is ponding on nearly every field in the valley where the rivers Severn and Vyrnwy meet on the English-Welsh border. Swollen rivers have been sluggishly sitting in the valley for months. Inhabitants' attempts to protect their homes from flooding are part of a losing battle played out across the country.
  • Water Resources Commission: Coronavirus, Water And Climate Change
    [gepubliceerd op: 30/03/2020]
    As the world's largest natural resource, water plays a central part in sustaining ecosystems and life on earth. Climate change impacts water resources and affects many sectors of the economy in many nations.
  • 12 Amazing Documentaries on Sustainability, Regeneration That You Now Have Time to Watch
    [gepubliceerd op: 02/04/2020]
    As many of us find ourselves with much more time at home due to the COVID-19 crisis, a lot of us are finding opportunities to do things we couldn't quite get to in the course of our 'regular lives' before the widespread lockdowns.
  • UN gets new dates for biodiversity convention talks
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    Two meetings of the UN Convention on Biological Diversity's permanent subsidiary bodies, previously scheduled for May 2020, have tentatively been rescheduled for August and September 2020, respectively.
  • The 'super year for biodiversity': Undermined by a wildlife market?
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    This year's meeting of the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) is being curtailed by the COVID-19 outbreak. Ironically, the pandemic most likely first emerged from wildlife being traded in a live animal market in Wuhan, China, writes Janice Weatherley Singh.
  • Protecting tropics could save half of species on brink, report says
    [gepubliceerd op: 30/03/2020]
    In 2019, a landmark UN report revealed that nearly 1 million species face extinction due to human activities and climate change. A ground-breaking new study offers a solution to save more than half of these doomed species, while slowing climate breakdown: Conserve just 30 percent of tropical lands.
  • The next great threat to Brazil's golden lion tamarin: Yellow fever
    [gepubliceerd op: 30/03/2020]
    In April 2018, workers with the Associação Mico-Leão-Dourado, a Brazilian NGO dedicated to the protection of the golden lion tamarin, found one of the endangered primates, apparently sick and unable to climb trees, lying on the forest floor in Aldeia, some 80 kilometers (50 miles) northeast of Rio de Janeiro city.
  • Giant leap for toadkind after Yorkshire fell runs are cancelled
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    The cancellation of a series of cross-country running races in West Yorkshire because of coronavirus has apparently saved hundreds of migrating toads from being squashed underfoot.
  • Wildlife rescue centres struggle to treat endangered species in coronavirus outbreak
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    Last Thursday morning Louisa Baillie drove down the five-kilometre dirt track that connects her jungle home in the Amazon rainforest to the main road. At the junction, she parked, hiking the rest of the way into Mera, a town of about 8,000 people.
  • Nestlé achieves key milestones in helping end deforestation and restoring forests in cocoa
    [gepubliceerd op: 27/03/2020]
    Nestlé has today reported significant progress in its efforts to help end deforestation and restore forests in its cocoa supply chain in Côte d'Ivoire and Ghana. The company has published its Cocoa & Forests Initiative report (pdf, 17Mb), highlighting key milestones achieved.
  • Save our forests and protect ourselves
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    SCIENTISTS from all over the world, including disease ecologists at Ecohealth Alliance who are studying malaria in East Malaysia, warn that human activities in forested areas, such as forest-clearing, road-building, mining, hunting, and logging, cause major disruptions to ecosystems, which then causes diseases to spread from their natural wild hosts to new hosts, including humans.
  • Camera traps completed one of the most thorough surveys of African rainforest yet
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    Tropical rainforests are the world's richest land habitats for biodiversity, harbouring stunning numbers of plant and animal species. The Amazon and the Congo basins, together with Asian rainforests, represent only 6% of Earth's land surface, and yet more than 50% of global biodiversity can be found under their shade.
  • Happy 60th Birthday to Madagascar! World's Most Biodiverse Island Gets Gift of 60 Million Trees
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    To celebrate its 60th birthday, the nation of Madagascar held its largest ever tree-planting ceremony, with a million seedlings going into the ground in just a few hours after the speeches concluded. The country is preparing to plant a million trees for each year of its six decade history.
  • COVID-19 lockdown: Wild animals freely roam Bihar's forests and fields
    [gepubliceerd op: 02/04/2020]
    Wild animals are freely roaming human settlements in Bihar as people stay inside their homes due to the 21-day nationwide lockdown in the wake of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak. A leopard has been spotted roaming in an Indian Air Force base near Patna. Nilgai antelope have been spotted in wheat and maize fields of Bakhtiarpur and Bhojpur. And an old, male tiger has made a 150-kilometre-long journey from Madhya Pradesh to take up residence in the state's Kaimur Wildlife Sanctuary.
  • Brazil, a tapir is born in the Atlantic Forest for the first time in over a century
    [gepubliceerd op: 02/04/2020]
    The tapir is an important species, crucial to its ecosystem because so many others depends on it. These strange, funny-looking creatures - the last remaining specimens of the Perissodactyla order - are thus able to literally shape the environment they inhabit.
  • Deforestation linked to emergence of new diseases
    [gepubliceerd op: 02/04/2020]
    The continuing deforestation in the country could put the Philippines at risk from the emergence of new infectious diseases, as it loses one of its main protective barriers from possible outbreaks.
  • 'Seven Worlds, One Planet' premieres on BBC World
    [gepubliceerd op: 30/03/2020]
    'Seven Worlds, One Planet' tells unknown, unseen, and unexpected wildlife stories, while it also uncovers the fundamental truth about what makes each one of our seven continents unique.
  • How COVID-19 shutdowns have affected the animal kingdom
    [gepubliceerd op: 30/03/2020]
    Photographs that went viral earlier in the pandemic seemed to suggest some environmental hope amid all the coronavirus woe: swans and dolphins seemingly appeared in the normally cloudy and crowded canals of Venice, which had gone quiet and clear during lockdown.
  • Environmental diplomacy slams on the brakes
    [gepubliceerd op: 30/03/2020]
    The unraveling of globalization induced by coronavirus is not limited to trade and travel: Global environmental negotiations are also in disarray.
  • Wildlife charity plans to buy UK land to give it back to nature
    [gepubliceerd op: 30/03/2020]
    A new national wildlife charity called Heal Rewilding is planning to buy ecologically depleted land across Britain and give it back to nature. The charity, which launches on Monday, is crowdfunding and will seek former farms, green belt or lower-grade land where wildlife can recover. The sites will be within easy reach of large towns and cities to benefit more people
  • Builder aims to help UK construction industry kick its plastic habit
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    A builder from Merseyside has launched a project that aims to remove plastic from the British construction industry within two decades.Neal Maxwell, who has worked in the trade for more than 30 years, co-founded the non-profit organisation Changing Streams after a trip to the Arctic
  • We can't go back to normal': how will coronavirus change the world?
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    Everything feels new, unbelievable, overwhelming. At the same time, it feels as if we've walked into an old recurring dream. In a way, we have. We've seen it before, on TV and in blockbusters. We knew roughly what it would be like, and somehow this makes the encounter not less strange, but more so.
  • Coronavirus threatens major climate talks
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    Ecologists and activists now fear key global environmental targets could fail to be set as major international meetings are thrown into doubt.
  • Coronavirus, faith leaders and sustainable development
    [gepubliceerd op: 02/04/2020]
    The coronavirus has turned our world upside down. Countries, societies, families and individuals are affected in so many ways. In the midst of this global crisis we believe that this is also a time for innovation, for finding new and better ways to tackle our global challenges.
  • Open Letter to Global Leaders - A Healthy Planet for Healthy People
    [gepubliceerd op: 30/03/2020]
    Call to Action from the Planetary Emergency Partnership*: Emerging from the Planetary Emergency and partnering between People and Nature. It is time to harness our fears, build hope and drive action to respond to the human health, economic, climate and biodiversity crisis with solutions that build resilient societies on the longer term.
  • Tiny fly from Los Angeles has a taste for crushed invasive snails
    [gepubliceerd op: 02/04/2020]
    As part of their project BioSCAN - devoted to the exploration of the unknown insect diversity in and around the city of Los Angeles - the scientists at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County (USA) have already discovered numerous insects that are new to science, but they are still only guessing about the lifestyles of these species.
  • We can bring the world's oceans back to health by 2050, scientists conclude
    [gepubliceerd op: 02/04/2020]
    The world's oceans can be nursed back to health by 2050 if there is a concerted global effort to tackle climate change and restore marine habitats, a team of the world's top ocean scientists has concluded.
  • What can be learned from the microbes on a turtle's shell?
    [gepubliceerd op: 30/03/2020]
    Research published in the journal Microbiology has found that a unique type of algae, usually only seen on the shells of turtles, affects the surrounding microbial communities. It is hoped that these findings can be applied to support the conservation of turtles. Previous research has shown that a diverse microbiome can protect animals against infections.
  • Scientists find bug that feasts on toxic plastic
    [gepubliceerd op: 30/03/2020]
    A bacterium that feeds on toxic plastic has been discovered by scientists. The bug not only breaks the plastic down but uses it as food to power the process. The bacterium, which was found at a waste site where plastic had been dumped, is the first that is known to attack polyurethane.
  • Model: What increased woody biomass use looks like for the global forest ecosystem
    [gepubliceerd op: 30/03/2020]
    Incentivizing both sequestration and avoidance of emissions- using a carbon rental or carbon tax and subsidy approach-versus only a carbon tax encourages protection of natural forests by valuing the standing stock, according to a new study led by Georgia Institute of Technology.
  • Researchers create framework for evaluating environmental stopgap measures
    [gepubliceerd op: 30/03/2020]
    Ending global environmental crises such as climate change and slowing the growing number of extinctions of plant and animal species will require radical solutions that could take centuries to implement. Meanwhile, the crises are damaging the planet and human well-being in ways that cannot wait for perfect solutions.
  • Control of anthropogenic emissions can improve water quality in coastal seas
    [gepubliceerd op: 30/03/2020]
    A new study highlights the importance of reducing fossil fuel combustion, not only to curb the trend of global warming, but also to improve the quality of China's coastal waters.
  • Mangroves could turn tide on carbon output
    [gepubliceerd op: 30/03/2020]
    Research has found that changes in current land management practices in the mangrove forests of West Papua Province, Indonesia could have significant impacts on the country's future emission reduction targets.
  • 'Probably the worst year in a century': the environmental toll of 2019
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    Record heat and drought across Australia delivered the worst environmental conditions across the country since at least 2000, with river flows, tree cover and wildlife being hit on an "unprecedented scale", according to a new report.
  • What can fruit flies teach us about how creatures find food?
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    Can you imagine looking for a destination without a GPS, visual landmarks, or even street signs? This is the reality for fruit flies, as they search for food or a mate. Researchers have uncovered different cues that influence these searches, but until now, haven't yet understood how individual directional cues and search movements are used together.
  • Food stockpiling: Consumers should cut down food waste
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    More than three quarters of New Zealand's retail food waste is being saved from landfill, in stark contrast to Kiwi households, Otago researchers say.
  • Seafloor of Fram Strait is a sink for microplastic from Arctic and North Atlantic Ocean
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    Working in the Arctic Fram Strait, scientists from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have found microplastic throughout the water column with particularly high concentrations at the ocean floor. Using model-based simulations, they have also found an explanation for this high level of pollution.
  • Runny honey, furry spinach and shiny apples: Surprising facts about your food
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    Spending a lot more time in your house doesn't have to make you any less curious about the world around you. Just look inside your kitchen cupboards and there's a wealth of chemistry just bursting to get out.
  • Defaunation in rainforests could have more severe consequences than reported
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    Tropical rainforests are emptying out due to the ongoing extinction of animal species caused by overhunting and forest fragmentation
  • What a hoot: The adventures of Australia's youngest scientist
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    At just six, Grace Fulton is possibly Australia's youngest scientist, participating in field research to help protect precious owl species.
  • When warblers warn of cowbirds, blackbirds get the message
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    This is the story of three bird species and how they interact. The brown-headed cowbird plays the role of outlaw: It lays its eggs in other birds' nests and lets them raise its young-often at the expense of the host's nestlings. To combat this threat, yellow warblers have developed a special "seet" call that means, "Look out! Cowbird!"
  • Untangling the social lives of spiders
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    The idea of a complex spider society-in which thousands of spiders live, hunt, and raise their young together in a single colony-is unsettling to many of us. We are perhaps lucky then that this scene is relatively rare among arachnids. Among the 40,000 known species of spiders, the vast majority live solitary lives and will often show aggression toward other spiders they encounter, even within their own species.
  • Impact of marine carbon on climate change to be investigated by Warwick Scientists
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    185 scientists won part of the European Research Council's (ERC) ?450 million for Europe's long-term frontier research, one of which was Professor David Scanlan, from the School of Life Sciences at the University of Warwick.
  • About the distribution of biodiversity on our planet
    [gepubliceerd op: 02/04/2020]
    Since Charles Darwin, biologists have been using the so-called "biotic interactions" hypothesis to explain, at least in part, why the tropics around the equator are so species rich. The hypothesis focuses on the importance of interactions between species for biodiversity.
  • Study finds fish have diverse, distinct gut microbiomes
    [gepubliceerd op: 02/04/2020]
    The rich biodiversity of coral reefs even extends to microbial communities within fish, according to new research. The study in Proceedings of the Royal Society: Biological Sciences reports that several important grazing fish on Caribbean coral reefs each harbor a distinct microbial community within their guts, revealing a new perspective on reef ecology.
  • Study offers new insight into the impact of ancient migrations on the European landscape
    [gepubliceerd op: 02/04/2020]
    Neolithic populations have long been credited with bringing about a revolution in farming practices across Europe. However, a new study suggests it was not until the Bronze Age several millennia later that human activity led to significant changes to the continent's landscape.
  • Impacts of cover crop planting dates on soil properties after 4 years
    [gepubliceerd op: 02/04/2020]
    Cover crop impacts on soil properties depends on cover crop productivity. Planting cover crops early and in a diverse mix of species could be an option to boost biomass production and enhance benefits to soils. However, the impacts of early planting and species mixes on soil properties are not well understood.
  • Where lions roam: West African big cats show no preference between national parks, hunting zones
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    West African lions are a critically endangered subpopulation, with an estimated 400 remaining and strong evidence of ongoing declines.
  • As pangolin trade heats up, Nigeria urged to do more to crack down
    [gepubliceerd op: 02/04/2020]
    Law enforcement officials around the world have seized more than 200 tonnes of pangolin scales since 2016, more than half of it linked to Nigeria, a new report has found.
  • Why communities must be at the heart of conserving wildlife, plants and ecosystems
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    A little more than a year ago, the Haida Nation released the Land-Sea-People plan to manage Gwaii Haanas, off the coast of northern British Columbia, "from mountaintop to seafloor as a single, interconnected ecosystem."
  • Indigenous people are most vulnerable to the spread of coronavirus in Latin America
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    The health situation of indigenous peoples due to infectious-contagious diseases is already serious due to its high prevalence and the very poor health service. The coronavirus would further aggravate this situation," Peruvian anthropologist Beatriz Huertas, who specialises in indigenous peoples, says of the health conditions and risks that Amazonian peoples now face in the presence of the COVID-19 strain of coronavirus.
  • Indigenous Leaders Issue Plea for COVID Pandemic Protection
    [gepubliceerd op: 31/03/2020]
    Indigenous leaders from across South America on Monday issued a desperate plea for protection against the COVID-19 pandemic, warning that the virus poses an "existential threat" to their communities.