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CBD Daily News Headlines

RDF feed: https://www.cbd.int/rss/headlines.aspx
  • Biodiversity is crucial for South Africa's food security
    [gepubliceerd op: 27/11/2020]
    The Covid-19 pandemic is teaching us all some very important lessons. In particular, it is reminding us that our health, our economy and our way of life are built on a fragile foundation that is far too often taken for granted.
  • Over three quarters of worlds largest companies do not report risks from biodiversity loss: KPMG survey
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    Businesses worldwide have a critical role to play in addressing the inherent, existential risks of biodiversity loss. Yet, less than one-quarter (23 percent) of companies worldwide at risk from the loss of biodiversity are currently disclosing that risk in their corporate reporting, according to The Time has Come, KPMG International's Survey of Sustainability Reporting 2020.
  • Jamaica lead authority for Caribbean climate change project
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    Jamaica has been designated the lead national authority among seven Caribbean countries for the Green Climate Fund (GCF) Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) project, which is being undertaken through a US$1.2-million grant.
  • Guest post: Investigating climate change's 'humidity paradox'
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    Water vapour is fundamental to life on Earth. As well as being a greenhouse gas, water vapour is the basis for clouds and rain. Therefore, it sustains plants, forests and our ability to grow food.
  • The impact of climate displacement on the right to education
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    In 2018, 17.2 million people were internally displaced as a result of natural disasters (IDMC 2019). Just one year later, in 2019, 24.9 million people were displaced due to natural disasters and extreme weather events (IDMC 2020).
  • How the institutional response to COVID-19 can prepare us for climate change
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    When Hannah Arendt, the German-American philosopher, reflected on the dawn of the nuclear age, she observed that a world that relegates existential questions to technical and scientific language alone is a world in which people have lost the ability to author their own life.
  • 'Mock Cop26' activists vote on treaty ahead of 2021 climate summit
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    Young people from 140 countries who attended an online "mock Cop26" climate summit have presented a treaty of 18 policies to Nigel Topping, the UK's high level climate action champion.
  • Climate crisis to triple flooding threat for low-income US homes by 2050
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    The amount of affordable housing in the US vulnerable to coastal flooding is set to triple over the next 30 years, a new study has found in a further sign of the escalating hardships faced by low-income Americans amid an unraveling climate crisis.
  • Australia endures hottest spring ever, with average temperatures more than 2C above average
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    Australia has sweltered through its hottest spring and November on record, with both the season and the month more than 2C warmer than the long-term average.
  • How restoring flood plains can help protect the climate
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    Floods often bring ruin and devastation, usually only avoided using expensive flood barriers and other engineering. But there is a quick and easy way to avoid much flooding: by restoring or creating flood plains.
  • Climate change: Temperature analysis shows UN goals 'within reach'
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    A new analysis, seen by the BBC, suggests the goals of the UN Paris climate agreement are getting "within reach." The Climate Action Tracker group looked at new climate promises from China and other nations, along with the carbon plans of US President-elect Joe Biden.
  • What is a white-lipped peccary? Candid Animal Cam is in South America
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    Camera traps bring you closer to the secretive natural world and are an important conservation tool to study wildlife. This week we're meeting the white-lipped peccary.
  • Wildlife photographer of the year 2020: people's choice - in pictures
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    Now in its 56th year, the wildlife photographer of the year showcases the world's best nature photography. The competition is run by the Natural History Museum in London and the exhibition there runs until 4 July 2021.
  • Rare & Endangered Indian Pangolin Rescued Near Agra, Released Back Into Its Natural Habitat
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    A rare and endangered Indian pangolin was rescued by the Wildlife SOS after it was seen wandering across a field in Bichpuri village, around 10 km from Agra city. Being the world's most trafficked animal, pangolins are under constant threat from poachers and sometimes they even fall victim to road accidents
  • Endangered Vancouver Island marmots are making a comeback
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    Vancouver Island marmots may just be the antidote required for the dystopian times we are living in. If you must be trapped inside during this current winter of discontent, alone at a desk, scrolling through hours of video - best it be watching one of the most endearing animals on the planet.
  • Amazon deforestation tops 11,000 sq km in Brazil, reaching 12-year high
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon topped 11,000 square kilometers for the first time since 2008 reports the Brazilian government.
  • Socio-Economic Linkages between Sustainable Land Management, Climate Change & Biodiversity in Liberia
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    Liberia faces numerous environmental challenges including land degradation, fragmentation, deforestation, soil erosion, and pollution. The dependence on forestry presents a unique environmental risk as Liberia's forest is part of the West African Hotspot.
  • Global mega-trends impact forest communities, scientists find
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    Forests and the livelihoods they provide through ecosystem services are increasingly impacted by infrastructure development and other global trends that undermine efforts to achieve sustainability goals, according to a new study by international experts.
  • How women from Hazaribagh are sparking a green revolution in the heart of India's coal state
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    Women farmers like Rina Yadav - a mother of three - are part of PRADAN and Corteva Agriscience's initiative to promote sustainable agriculture and financial literacy in Hazaribagh, Jharkhand.
  • Meet the 2020 Goldman Environmental Prize Winners
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    Six grassroots environmental activists will receive the prestigious Goldman Environmental Prize in a virtual ceremony this year. Dubbed the "Green Nobel Prize," this award is given annually to environmental heroes from each of the world's six inhabited continents.
  • Report assesses promises and pitfalls of private investment in conservation
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    The Ecological Society of America (ESA) today released a report entitled "Innovative Finance for Conservation: Roles for Ecologists and Practitioners" that offers guidelines for developing standardized, ethical and effective conservation finance projects.
  • Owls of delight! How online birdwatching became my lockdown treat
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    Birdwatching has been a Covid success story: sales of feeders have soared and birdwatchers broke a world record for the most birds observed during Cornell Lab of Ornithology's "Global Big Day" in May.
  • New algae threatens conservation of Caribbean coral reefs
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    Human activity is making the conservation of Caribbean coral reefs difficult - but a new algal threat is adding pressure to an already precarious situation
  • Octogenarian snapper found in WA becomes oldest tropical reef fish by two decades
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    An 81-year-old midnight snapper caught off the coast of Western Australia has taken the title of the oldest tropical reef fish recorded anywhere in the world.
  • Front row seats for birth of new corals livestreamed from Reef
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    The ground-breaking work of the Southern Cross University marine scientist who first discovered the dazzling coral sex phenomenon will be shared with Australian audiences on ABC TV's Reef Live this weekend.
  • The 'smell' of coral as an indicator of reef health
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    A study conducted in the southern Great Barrier Reef reveals the chemical diversity of emissions from healthy corals. The researchers found that across the reef-building coral species studied on Heron Island, the abundance and chemical diversity of their gas emissions fell significantly during heat stress experiments. With the increasing frequency of heat stress events, understanding coral emissions may prove to be a key reef conservation tool.
  • How the shrew brain adapts to winter
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    Seasonal, energy-conserving neural adaptions could allow shrews to reduce their metabolic demands during winter, a study finds. Animals adapt to changing environmental conditions such as seasonal cycles to enhance their chances of survival. Although seasonal variation is associated with well-known behavioral patterns such as hibernation, the effects on the brain have not been clear.
  • Peeking into the pods of black soybeans
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    Nagoya University scientists have furthered understanding of how plants make a common pigment that might have medicinal applications. They published their findings in the journal Scientific Reports.
  • Birds able to adjust egg-laying date
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    Many birds are able to change their egg-laying date to cope with variable conditions, new research shows.The study examined birds and mammals, and found birds in particular showed the ability to find the "optimum" laying date.
  • Stickleback study reveals 'parallel' evolution
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    Animal species in different parts of the world can evolve in "parallel" in response to similar conditions, according to a new study of fish.
  • Flashy lizards are more attractive to mates and to predators
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    In the lizard world, flashy colors attract the interest of females looking for mates. But they can make colorful males desirable to other eyes, too-as lunch.
  • Unexpected similarity between honey bee and human social life
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    Bees and humans are about as different organisms as one can imagine. Yet despite their many differences, surprising similarities in the ways that they interact socially have begun to be recognized in the last few years. Now, a team of researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, building on their earlier studies, have experimentally measured the social networks of honey bees and how they develop over time.
  • Examining climate effects of regional nuclear exchange
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    A team of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers has found that the global climatic consequences of a regional nuclear weapons exchange could range from a minimal impact to more significant cooling lasting years.
  • Why did the woolly rhino go extinct?
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    In the arctic tundra of northeastern Siberia lies a graveyard of a now-extinct species of megafauna, the woolly rhinoceros, dating back 50,000 years. Now, a new genomic analysis of the remains of 14 of these fantastical furry yellow creatures shows that climate change was the likely culprit for their disappearance-not hunting by migrating humans, as scientists had assumed.
  • New snail subspecies with 'upside down shell' found in last green frontier east of Manila
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    In 2017, a group of researchers surveying mollusks in a popular ecotourism site east of the Philippine capital stumbled upon a tiny land snail with a unique "upside down shell."
  • Deep-sea volcanoes: Windows into the subsurface
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    Hydrothermally-active submarine volcanoes account for much of Earth's volcanism and are mineral-rich biological hotspots, yet very little is known about the dynamics of microbial diversity in these systems.
  • Commercial wildlife farms present grave threat to biodiversity
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    In recent decades, along with the robust development of the economy, the demand for wildlife in Vietnam, especially in big cities, has increased. Aided by overlapping and inconsistent legal regulations on the management of animal origin, wildlife hunting and trafficking activities have intensified in Vietnam and threatened biodiversity.
  • EU funds mean more to see and enjoy in Gozo
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    Gozo's intricate link with tourism - international and domestic - has been well documented over time. Pandemics permitting, tens of thousands of Maltese residents cross over to the sister island every month for a few days of vacation while hundreds of thousands more who holiday in Malta, frequently spend a day or two visiting Gozo.
  • New study shows rights-based conservation as viable path to achieve global biodiversity agenda
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    With the UN, NGOs and conservationists advocating to place 30 per cent or more of the planet's terrestrial area under formal conservation by 2030, a new study cautions of the potential costs of using exclusionary conservation approaches to meet those targets.
  • Protecting Indigenous Languages Is Protecting Biodiversity
    [gepubliceerd op: 01/12/2020]
    One million animal and plant species face extinction due to human activity, according to the United Nations. Now, think about cultural production-art and literature that we have invested to address the extinction of just a handful of species (passenger pigeon included). Quite a bit actually. The extinction of one million species feels rather abstract, beyond the comprehension of human cultural production at the moment.